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/ What we’re curious about.
Elizabeth Leugers

9 Things to Know About Allie

We’re happy to have Allie in our account department this summer!

1) Tell us a memorable story of yourself when you were a kid.

When I was in elementary school, I took a trip to Disney World with my extended family. While we were waiting to ride Thunder Mountain Railroad, my cousins and I started climbing on some tall boulders along the sides of the line. When I got to the top of the boulder, I lost my balance and ended up falling backwards into a bed of cactuses. My parents pulled me out of the cactuses and took me to Disney’s small urgent care where nurses tried to yank the cactus spikes out of my head. They said they weren’t quite able to get all of them out—so who knows, they might still be there today…

 

2) What is a burm? And how did you create a social network in one?

Six-year-old me thought the tall hedges/small trees surrounding my house in Cary, North Carolina were called “burms,” though a recent Google search informed me that this is technically incorrect. They are just hedges. Anyway, I used to take a pair of shears and cut out a hole on the outside of the hedge, then continue cutting until there was a tunnel leading into our neighbors’ backyards. Once my neighborhood friends caught on, they continued cutting the tunnel to connect to their homes. Eventually, the tunnel grew to include most of my neighbors, and we would meet in the burm (*cough* hedge) to hang out or eat candy we stole from our homes 😉

 

3) What unconventional choice did you make in your first year of high school that allowed you to immerse yourself in the theater world? Do you think that choice still has an impact on you today?

After my eighth-grade year, I decided to attend a school that only held classes twice a week. It was a school for students who were homeschooled, but also included kids who traveled for sports or dance. I decided to go there in order to be able to do professional theater. I was cast in a production of A Christmas Carol at a theater in Springboro, where we did upwards of 70 shows in a season, some of which took place during the school day. Choosing to go to that school, though just for a year, showed me how rewarding it is to be unconventional in my approach to education.

 

4) Why theater? What is it about that art form/communication style that lights you up more than others?

Having the ability to reach out and touch actors, sets and costumes gives theatrical performances a level of intimacy. Energy is constantly flowing from the performers to the audiences and vise versa, so that everyone in the theatre, on and off stage, contributes to creating the experience. I like that going to the theatre is interactive, not passive.

 

5) You go to school in Southern California, which has an awesome outdoor scene. Do you have any traditions you started since you have been out there?

Redlands is conveniently located an hour from ski slopes, the beach and the low desert. I became an Outdoor Program Trip Leader my freshman year so I could plan and lead trips for my peers to experience all that the area has to offer. One of the trips I led was to Ryan Mountain in Joshua Tree, which I have done the past two years.  I actually hiked Ryan for the first time my junior year on a high school trip, which is when I first heard about Redlands. The Ryan Mountain hike has become something of a tradition in my own life, and I hope that leaders continue to do trips there after I graduate.

6) Top 2 pet peeves:

  • Watching people eat on-screen
  • When Italian restaurants run out of bread (does happen)

 

7) What is your favorite meal to cook for someone else?

Not exactly a meal (or cooking for that matter), but I have spent my first two years of college perfecting the temperature/time balance for baking a chocolate chip cookie. Come find me, and I’ll tell you the trick.

 

8) What is one thing you get unreasonably excited about?

Receiving mail (including voicemail!!!)!!!

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